Reasons for shortened hip flexors

More and more people suffer from shortened hip flexors and their consequences. No wonder, because sitting for hours, as is common today, favors the shortening of the hip flexors. This can cause back pain and other complaints in the musculoskeletal system because shortened hip flexors lead to misalignments and tension in the spine.
It is still far too often recommended to stretch shortened hip flexors. However, this is a misconception. In order to bring the shortened hip flexors back into balance, you should not decontract them.

In this article, I will discuss you an exercise that has proven itself in my work as a naturopath and personal trainer to bring shortened hip flexors back into balance. Easy to implement and highly effective.

Also, if you want to learn more about hip flexor exercises for seniors this article will also give you some insight on that. 

The human musculoskeletal system is designed for upright posture on two legs. Walking upright is our natural form of locomotion and is one of the basic social movement patterns. For an upright position to be possible, all skeletal muscles must work together economically. All muscle groups must be in a balance of power. Otherwise, there are so-called muscular imbalances.

Tensioning or shortening a muscle group, no matter how small it may be, has a negative impact on our posture and the quality of our movements. Muscular imbalances between individual muscle groups and muscle chains impair our posture, our movements, as well as our physical and athletic performance.

Over time, this can lead to signs of overload and posture, ranging from back pain and neck tension to structural damage and so-called signs of wear on articular surfaces, cartilage tissue, intervertebral discs, etc.

Shortened hip flexors depend on the muscular balance between hip flexor and hip extensor. The hip joints are almost in the middle of the body, and they connect the legs to the pelvis and thus to the upper body. The hip muscles are essential for our upright posture and walking and running movements.

If we compare our basin with a water bowl filled to the brim, the bowl must be in a neutral, horizontal position so that the water cannot overflow on either side.

Our pelvis is only in this horizontal position when the hip joints are fully stretched when standing upright. Only then can our spine straighten up naturally and effortlessly, since the sacrum, which is in the back of the pelvis, forms the base of the spine.

So, the muscular balance between the hip muscles is crucial for our overall posture, especially for the ability to straighten the pelvis and thus the trunk. When the hip joints are stretched, the pelvis is in an upright and neutral position.

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